Although a bit magical, v-model is essentially syntax sugar for updating data on user input events, plus special care for some edge cases. If you click on the checkbox, it changes the value in the Vue instance. There is one more method to get all selected values from the checkboxes marked by the user. The value of vm.reversedMessage is always dependent on the value of vm.message. Vue is aware that vm.reversedMessage depends on vm.message , so it will update any bindings that depend on vm.reversedMessage when vm.message changes. Although a bit magical, v-model is essentially syntax sugar for updating data on user input events, plus special care for some edge cases. See the below example. cssClass. I make reusable checkbox custom element with vue. Basically something like this: component takes in an array through its props, maps over the array (just like the options of the component takes in an array through its props, maps over the array (just like the options of the component takes in an array through its props, maps over the array (just like the options of the Although a bit magical, v-model is essentially syntax sugar for updating data on user input events, plus special care for some edge cases. If you click on the checkbox, it changes the value in the Vue instance. There is one more method to get all selected values from the checkboxes marked by the user. The value of vm.reversedMessage is always dependent on the value of vm.message. Vue is aware that vm.reversedMessage depends on vm.message , so it will update any bindings that depend on vm.reversedMessage when vm.message changes. Although a bit magical, v-model is essentially syntax sugar for updating data on user input events, plus special care for some edge cases. See the below example. cssClass. I make reusable checkbox custom element with vue. Basically something like this: component takes in an array through its props, maps over the array (just like the options of the

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